How Brands Can Implement Local Content Marketing Programs (Part 2)

local content marketing

In part one of my article last month we defined what local content marketing is, and how brands can support the creation of  the content by the local businesses that sell their products and services.  

In this article, I’ll talk about some of the problems brands can have with executing online localized content marketing and the steps that can be taken to mitigate these issues.

  1. Challenge:  Not Having A Clear Content Marketing Production Process

The question of who actually generates the content becomes immediately apparent in large organizations. As brands, you are not well equipped to develop localized content for hundreds of markets, yet there are obviously some general content types transcend location.

Solution:  Developing a Formula that Works for Your Specific Organization

Identify sources in your organization (both at the brand and local level) who have the bandwidth and ability to research and can create topics of interest.

As mentioned in the part one of this article, templating can go a long way to solving this issue-- especially for online content. A large number of your local partners will never take the time to develop and write their own content. You can create templates to merge with your local partner’s details and information. The result is content that is substantively unique from one another and can be used on websites for local search and SEO.

If you control the CMS of their website(s) or webpage(s), you can implement the content on a brand level. If they control their own web properties, all you can do is provide instructions with some advice on the importance of local content marketing.

  1. Challenge:  Unanswered negative reviews

Another  source of content marketing can be tapping into third-party generated comments and reviews online.  These are now appearing in search results, right along with the business information. If there are negative reviews, potential customers may be reading them before they even see the store’s hours. Brands and their partners can’t afford for this type of negative content to rule the local content marketing ecosystem.

Solution: Provide a Review Monitoring Tool and Training

As a brand, you should set up review monitoring tools to help local partners catch all reviews that are made. 86% of brands miss customer feedback registered over social networks according to a VenueLabs study.  

Brands bite off more than they can chew if they think they can manage the sea of social media instead of offloading a majority of the responsibility to local partners. Provide local partners with examples and training on how to respond to negative feedback. Empower your local partners to put his or her business and your brand in a positive light, even in difficult situations. For an added level of oversight, brands can monitor aggregate customer feedback trends across hundreds of individual review sites / social profiles to keep a finger on the pulse of customer opinion, common product or service dissatisfaction.


The primary method of discovery for local products and services is a web search from a computer or mobile device. The long-term investment of local content development reigns supreme among strategies to address the find & research online, buy offline phenomenon. Those brands that take local content marketing seriously will get their local partners discovered by more customers in a sustainable way.

Neil Ingalls's picture
Neil Ingalls, Senior Marketing Operations Manager
Neil is a natural digital marketer with a mix of tech nerd, news junkie, and style. He began his marketing career in Boston with a specialization in SEO after graduating from Purdue University in Indiana. After a couple of years with a heavy SEO focus, Neil has branched out into the many other fascinating aspects of internet marketing.